entries friends calendar profile previous previous
Unamerikan Activities
peteyoung
Share
roman = Interested in writing, will send.
italics = Has a review, working on getting permission.
highlighted = Confirmed / received.
If a title is marked open and/or indicates a required word count, then this title still has space for the indicated number of words.
If a title is marked complete, then I have all the reviews I want for that title.

Last updated: 31 July 2014

SF MASTERWORKS – First Series (including most titles from the Hardcover Series)  |  77 / 77 complete

1     Joe Haldeman, The Forever War, 1974
  Farah Mendlesohn  |  Charles Dee Mitchell  | complete

2     Richard Matheson, I Am Legend, 1954
  Chris Bekofske  |  Charles Dee Mitchell  | complete

3     James Blish, Cities in Flight, 1955-1962
  Manny Rayner  |  Brian Clegg  |  Peter Young  |  Kate Sherrod  | complete

4     Philip K. Dick, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, 1968
  Jesse Hudson  |  Guy Salvidge  | complete

5     Alfred Bester, The Stars My Destination, 1956
  David Langford  | complete

6     Samuel R. Delany, Babel-17, 1966
  Rob Weber  | complete

7     Roger Zelazny, Lord of Light, 1967
  Jesse Hudson  |  Rich Horton  | complete

8     Gene Wolfe, The Fifth Head of Cerberus, 1972
  Kate Sherrod  |  Jesse Hudson  | complete

9     Frederik Pohl, Gateway, 1977
  Rob Weber  | complete

10     Cordwainer Smith, The Rediscovery of Man, 1975
  Tony Atkins  |  Jaime Oria  |  Rhys Hughes  |  Simon McLeish  | complete

11     Olaf Stapledon, Last and First Men, 1930
  Alfred Searls  |  Nicholas Whyte  |  Kate Sherrod  | complete

12     George R. Stewart, Earth Abides, 1949
  Gary Lovisi  |  Manny Rayner  | complete

13     Philip K. Dick, Martian Time-Slip, 1964
  Charles Dee Mitchell  | complete

14     Alfred Bester, The Demolished Man, 1953
  Manny Rayner  |  Charles Dee Mitchell  |  Megan Medina  |  Andy Wixon  | complete

15     John Brunner, Stand on Zanzibar, 1968
  Karen Burnham  |  Kate Sherrod  | complete

16     Ursula K. Le Guin, The Dispossessed, 1974
  Bruce Gillespie  |  Mark Monday  |  Manny Rayner  | complete

17     J.G. Ballard, The Drowned World, 1962
  Peter Young  |  Kate Sherrod  | complete

18     Kurt Vonnegut, The Sirens of Titan, 1959
  Kedar  |  Manny Rayner  |  Christopher J Garcia   | complete

19     Jack Vance, Emphyrio, 1969
  Mark Monday  | complete

20     Philip K. Dick, A Scanner Darkly, 1977
  Guy Salvidge  | complete

21     Olaf Stapledon, Star Maker, 1937
  Jesse Hudson  | complete

22     Michael Moorcock, Behold the Man, 1969
  Charles Dee Mitchell  |  Manny Rayner  |  Peter Young  | complete

23     Robert Silverberg, The Book of Skulls, 1972
  John DeNardo  | complete

24     H. G. Wells, The Time Machine, 1895
  Anthony G. Williams  |  Amy H. Sturgis  | complete

24     H. G. Wells, The War of the Worlds, 1898
  Ben Babcock  |  Basil Williams  |  Jonathan Terrington  |  Nicholas Whyte  | complete

25     Daniel Keyes, Flowers for Algernon, 1959
  Manny Rayner  |  Peter Young  |  John Coxon  | complete

26     Philip K. Dick, Ubik, 1969
  Randy Byers  | complete

27     Gregory Benford, Timescape, 1980
  Chris Amies  |  Charles Dee Mitchell  |  Simon McLeish  | complete

28     Theodore Sturgeon, More Than Human, 1953
  Victoria Strauss  | complete

29     Frederik Pohl, Man Plus, 1976
  Niall Alexander  | complete

30     James Blish, A Case of Conscience, 1958
  Christy Tidwell  |  Nicholas Whyte  | complete

31     M. John Harrison, The Centauri Device, 1975
  Charles Dee Mitchell  |  Bryan Alexander  | complete

32     Philip K. Dick, Dr. Bloodmoney, 1965
  Mark Monday  |  David Soyka  | complete

33     Brian Aldiss, Non-Stop, 1958
  Rich Horton  |  Charles Dee Mitchell  | complete

34     Arthur C. Clarke, The Fountains of Paradise, 1979
  Rob Weber  |  Glenn Myers  | complete

35     Keith Roberts, Pavane, 1968
  Brian Clegg  |  Manny Rayner  |  Margaret Johnson  | complete

36     Philip K. Dick, Now Wait for Last Year, 1975
  Charles Dee Mitchell  |  Guy Salvidge  | complete

37     Samuel R. Delany, Nova, 1968 
  Jonathan Thornton   | complete

38     H. G. Wells, The First Men in the Moon, 1901
  Michael Battaglia  | complete

39     Arthur C. Clarke, The City and the Stars, 1956
  J.P. Lantern   | complete

40     Greg Bear, Blood Music, 1985
  Thomas M. Wagner  |  Neal Asher  |  David A. Hardy  | complete

41     Frederik Pohl, Jem, 1979
  Andrew Spong  | complete

42     Ward Moore, Bring the Jubilee, 1952
  Peter Young  |  Andrew Spong  | complete

43     Philip K. Dick, VALIS, 1981
  Bruce Gillespie  |  Patrick Clark  |  Tim Powers  |  Paul Williams  | complete

44     Ursula K. Le Guin, The Lathe of Heaven, 1971
  John DeNardo  |  Bruce Gillespie  | complete

45     John Sladek, The Complete Roderick, 1980 & 1983
  Andrew Spong  | complete

46     Philip K. Dick, Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said, 1974
  Mike Philbin  | complete

47     H. G. Wells, The Invisible Man, 1897
  Amy H. Sturgis  |  Chris Hill  | complete

48     Sheri S. Tepper, Grass, 1989
  Cheryl Morgan  |  Andrew Spong  | complete

49     Arthur C. Clarke, A Fall of Moondust, 1961
  Kate Atherton  |  Lee A. Butler   | complete

50     Greg Bear, Eon, 1985
  Charles Dee Mitchell  |  Mark Chitty  | complete

51     Richard Matheson, The Shrinking Man, 1954
  Charles Dee Mitchell  |  J.P. Lantern  | complete

52     Philip K. Dick, The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch, 1964
  Alma Alexander  |  Charles Dee Mitchell  | complete

53     Michael Moorcock, The Dancers at the End of Time, 1974-1976
  Charles Dee Mitchell  | complete

54     Frederik Pohl & Cyril M. Kornbluth, The Space Merchants, 1952
  Anthony G. Williams  |  Eric Brown  | complete

55     Philip K. Dick, Time Out of Joint, 1959
  Guy Salvidge  | complete

56     Robert Silverberg, Downward to the Earth, 1970
  Mark Monday  |  A.C. Fellows  | complete

57     Philip K. Dick, The Simulacra, 1964
  Charles Dee Mitchell  |  L.J. Hurst  | complete

58     Philip K. Dick, The Penultimate Truth, 1964
  Charles Dee Mitchell  |  Joe Pfeiffer  |  Simon McLeish  | complete

59     Robert Silverberg, Dying Inside, 1972
  Cécile Cristofari  |  Peter Young  |  Tony Atkins  | complete

60     Larry Niven, Ringworld, 1970
  Anthony G. Williams  |  Andrew Spong  |  Peter Young  | complete

61     Geoff Ryman, The Child Garden, 1989
  Randy Mcdonald  | complete

62     Hal Clement, Mission of Gravity, 1953
  A.C. Fellows  |   Scott Lynch  |  Tony Atkins  |  Manny Rayner  | complete

63     Philip K. Dick, A Maze of Death, 1970
  Mike Philbin  | complete

64     Poul Anderson, Tau Zero, 1970
  Anthony G. Williams  |  Kate Atherton  |  Tony Atkins  |  Chris Mander  | complete

65     Arthur C. Clarke, Rendezvous with Rama, 1972
  Jesse Hudson  |  Anthony G. Williams  |  Dave O'Neill  | complete

66     Lucius Shepard, Life During Wartime, 1987
  Ross E. Lockhart  |  Cécile Cristofari  |  Simon McLeish  | complete

67     Kate Wilhelm, Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang, 1976
  Amy H. Sturgis  |  Megan Medina  | complete

68     Arkady & Boris Strugatsky, Roadside Picnic, 1971
  Annalee Newitz  | complete

69     Walter M. Miller, Jr., Dark Benediction, 1980
  Andrew Spong  | complete

70     Walter Tevis, Mockingbird, 1980
  Simon McLeish  |  Lars Guthrie  | complete

71     Frank Herbert, Dune, 1965
  Manny Rayner  |  Andrew Spong  |  Christopher J Garcia   | complete

72     Robert A. Heinlein, The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress, 1966
  Jesse Hudson  | complete

73     Philip K. Dick, The Man in the High Castle, 1962
  Charles Dee Mitchell  | complete

V       Walter M. Miller, Jr., A Canticle for Leibowitz, 1960
  Eli Johnson  |  Mark Monday  |  Peter Young  | complete

VI       Arthur C. Clarke, Childhood's End, 1953
  Ian McDonald  |  Mark Monday  | complete


2001 HARDCOVER SERIES – titles not yet included in the 1st or 2nd Series

II       Ursula Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness, 1969
  Jonathan Thornton  |  Megan Medina  |  Tanya Brown  | complete

X       John Wyndham, The Day of the Triffids, 1951
  Tony Keen  |  Penny Hill  |  Andy Wixon  | complete


SF MASTERWORKS – Second Series (including forthcoming titles before August 2014)  |  58 / 58 complete

Christopher Priest, Inverted World, 1974
  Keith Stevenson  |  Andy Wixon  |  Kate Sherrod  | complete

Kurt Vonnegut, Cat's Cradle, 1963
  Manny Rayner  |  Peter Young  | complete

H.G. Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau, 1896
  M.J. Nicholls  |  Basil Williams  |  Joel Cunningham  |  Ben Babcock  | complete

Samuel R. Delany, Dhalgren, 1975
  Steve Shipman  |  Ian Sales  | complete

Brian Aldiss, Helliconia, 1982–1985
  Nigel Quinlan  |  Mark Yon  | complete

H.G. Wells, The Food of the Gods, 1904
  G.K. Chesterton  |  Mark Yon  | complete

Jack Finney, The Body Snatchers, 1955
  Mark Yon  |  Peter Young  | complete

Joanna Russ, The Female Man, 1975
  Peter Young  |  Ademption  | complete

M.J. Engh, Arslan, 1976
  Abigail Nussbaum  | complete

William Gibson & Bruce Sterling, The Difference Engine, 1990
  Carlos Ferreira  |  Howard Mittelmark  |  J.G. Keely  | complete

Christopher Priest, The Prestige, 1995
  David Hebblethwaite  |  Jonathan Terrington  | complete

Brian Aldiss, Greybeard, 1964
  Charles Dee Mitchell  |  Tony Atkins  | complete

Olaf Stapledon, Sirius, 1944
  Manny Rayner  |  A.C. Fellows  |  Stuart Carter  | complete

Dan Simmons, Hyperion, 1989
  Jesse Hudson  |  Ben Babcock  | complete

Clifford D. Simak, City, 1952
  Rhys Hughes  |  Mark Monday  |  Christy Tidwell  | complete

Frank Herbert, Hellstrom's Hive, 1973
  Rob Weber  | complete

William Tenn, Of Men and Monsters, 1968
  Peter Young  |  Mark Yon  |  Charles Dee Mitchell  | complete

Karel Čapek, R.U.R. & War with the Newts, 1921 & 1936
  Matthew Lloyd  |  Rhys Hughes  |  Andy Wixon  | complete

Christopher Priest, The Affirmation, 1981
  David Hebblethwaite  |  Vacuous Wastrel  |  Rob Adey  | complete

Cecelia Holland, Floating Worlds, 1975
  Iain Merrick  |  Bruce Gillespie  |  Antony Jones  | complete

Algys Budrys, Rogue Moon, 1960
  John DeNardo  |  Charles Dee Mitchell  | complete

Harlan Ellison, ed., Dangerous Visions, 1967
  Mark Yon  | complete

Olaf Stapledon, Odd John, 1935
  Anthony Jones  |  Manny Rayner  | complete

Dan Simmons, The Fall of Hyperion, 1990
  Ben Babcock  |  Kemper  | complete

Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, 1979
  Manny Rayner  |  J.G. Keely  |  Lee Battersby  | complete

Pat Cadigan, Synners, 1991
  Steph Bennion  |  Sylvia Kelso  |  Chris Mander  | complete

Nicola Griffith, Ammonite, 1993
  Alix Heintzman  | complete

Karen Joy Fowler, Sarah Canary, 1991
  Ben Babcock  | complete

Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, 1818
  Mark Monday  |  Nicholas Whyte  |  Martin McClellan  |  Bruce Gillespie  | complete

D.G. Compton, The Continuous Katherine Mortenhoe, 1973
  Ian Sales  | complete

Connie Willis, Doomsday Book, 1992
  Donna Carter  |  David Norman  | complete

Russell Hoban, Riddley Walker, 1980
  Stephen Zillwood  |  Chris Mander  | complete

David I. Masson, The Caltraps of Time, 1968
  Stuart Carter  | complete

Rachel Pollack, Unquenchable Fire, 1988
  Karen Heuler  |  Peter Young  | complete

John Crowley, Engine Summer, 1979
  Bill McClain  |  Peter Young  | complete

Colin Greenland, Take Back Plenty, 1990
  David Hebblethwaite  | complete

Nicola Griffith, Slow River, 1995
  Ben Babcock  |  David Langford  | complete

Sheri S. Tepper, The Gate to Women's Country, 1988
  Stuart Carter  | complete

George Turner, The Sea and Summer, 1987
  Mike Dalke  | complete

Connie Willis, To Say Nothing of the Dog, 1998
  Christine Bellerive  |  Ian  |  Simon McLeish  | complete

Eric Frank Russell, Wasp, 1957
  Jo Walton  | complete

Isaac Asimov, The Gods Themselves, 1972
  Manny Rayner  |  Rob Weber  | complete

James Morrow, This Is the Way the World Ends, 1986
  Michael Brown  |  Tracey  |  Bruce Gillespie  | complete

John Crowley, The Deep, 1975
  Rhys Hughes  |  Jonathan Thornton  | complete

Michael Bishop, No Enemy But Time, 1982
  Megan Medina  | complete

Connie Willis, Time Is the Fire: The Best of Connie Willis, 2013
  Kev McVeigh  | complete

Robert Heinlein, Double Star, 1956
  Sarah Pinsker  |  Jonathan Thornton  | complete

Alastair Reynolds, Revelation Space, 2000
  Mark Monday  | complete

Jack Womack, Random Acts of Senseless Violence, 1998
  Paul  |  Kate Sherrod  | complete

Douglas Adams, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe, 1980
  Manny Rayner  | complete

Michael Bishop, Transfigurations, 1979
  Joachim Boaz  | complete

Douglas Adams, Life, the Universe and Everything, 1982
  David Haddock  |  Paul Bowers  |  Jonathan Terrington  | complete

Robert A. Heinlein, The Door Into Summer, 1957
  Rich Horton  |  Liam Proven  |  Marion Pitman  | complete

T.J. Bass, Half Past Human, 1971
  Jonathan Thornton  | complete

Leigh Brackett, The Long Tomorrow, 1955
  Charles Dee Mitchell  |  Peter Young  | complete

T.J. Bass, The Godwhale, 1974
  Eddie Tomaselli  |  J.P. Lantern  | complete

James Tiptree, Jr., Her Smoke Rose Up Forever, 1990
  Niall Harrison  | complete

Arkady Strugatsky & Boris Strugatsky, Monday Begins on Saturday, 1965
  Zalka Csenge Virág  |  Dan Harlow  | complete

Tags:

peteyoung
Share
— acoustic —
Mike Howe, Heading West, 2013  ( UK )

— ambient / idm —
Richard Ackrill, The Lightness of Being, 2012  ( ? )
Mathias Grassow, Cosmic Chasm, 2000  ( GERMANY )
Kamal, Quiet Earth, 1993  ( GERMANY )
Koan, When the Silence Is Speaking, 2010  ( RUSSIA )  [ YOUTUBE ]
Terry Oldfield, Journey Into Space, 2012  ( UK )

— blues —
Joe Bonamassa, An Acoustic Evening at the Vienna Opera House, 2013  ( USA )
Bo Diddley, A Man Among Men, 1996  ( USA )

— jazz —
Misha Alperin, First Impression, 1999  ( UKRAINE )
Arild Andersen, Vasilis Tsabropoulos, John Marshall The Triangle, 2004  ( NORWAY )
Bill Bruford, Ralph Towner, Eddie Gomez If Summer Had Its Ghosts, 1997  ( UK / USA )
Bill Bruford's Earthworks, Stamping Ground, 1994  ( UK )
Bill Bruford's Earthworks, Apart, and Yet a Part, 1999  ( UK )
Miles Davis, Nefertiti, 1967  ( USA )
Miles Davis, On the Corner, 1972  ( USA )
Miles Davis, The Man with the Horn, 1981  ( USA )
Miles Davis, Star People, 1983  ( USA )
Miles Davis, You're Under Arrest, 1985  ( USA )
Itchy Fingers, Quark, 1987  ( UK )
Bill Frisell, In Line, 1983  ( USA )
Bill Frisell Band, Lookout for Hope, 1988  ( USA )
Jan Garbarek, Dansere, 1976  ( NORWAY )
Jan Garbarek, Places, 1978  ( NORWAY )
Jan Garbarek Group, Photo with Blue Sky, White Cloud, Wires, Windows and a Red Roof, 1979  ( NORWAY )
Jan Garbarek, Kjell Johnsen, Aftenland, 1980  ( NORWAY )
Jan Garbarek, Paths, Prints, 1982  ( NORWAY )
Mark Isham, Mark Isham, 1990  ( USA )
Charles Lloyd, The Call, 1993  ( USA )
Charles Lloyd, All My Relations, 1995  ( USA )
Masqualero, Re-Enter, 1991  ( NORWAY )
Maurice and the Beejays, His Martian Flying Cobra, 2013  ( UK )  [ MAURICE AND THE BEEJAYS ]
Jaco Pastorius, Jaco Pastorius, 1976  ( USA )
Jaco Pastorius, Word of Mouth, 1981  ( USA )
Courtney Pine, Journey to the Urge Within, 1986  ( UK )
Courtney Pine, To the Eyes of Creation, 1992  ( UK )
Tuck & Patti, Paradise Found, 1998  ( USA )
Ralph Towner, Lost and Found, 1996  ( USA )
Weather Report, Mysterious Traveler, 1974  ( USA )

— post-rock —
I Am Waiting for You Last Summer, Come Full Circle, 2011  ( RUSSIA )
Sleepmakeswaves, In Today Already Walks Tomorrow, 2008  ( AUSTRALIA )

— reggae / dub —
Adrian Sherwood, Survival and Resistance, 2012  ( UK )

— rock / pop / soul —

Aeroc, R+B=, 2011  ( ? )
Erykah Badu, Baduizm, 1997  ( USA )
Erykah Badu, Live, 1997  ( USA )
Franz Ferdinand, Franz Ferdinand, 2004  ( UK )
Franz Ferdinand, Tonight: Franz Ferdinand, 2009  ( UK )
Robert Palmer, Honey, 1994  ( UK )
Bonnie Raitt, The Glow, 1979  ( USA )
Bonnie Raitt, Nick of Time, 1989  ( USA )
Nile Rodgers, B-Movie Matinee, 1985  ( USA )
Philipp Weigl, Fragmentary Proof, 2009  ( GERMANY )
Philipp Weigl, Land and Water, 2010  ( GERMANY )
Philipp Weigl, Monsters, 2011  ( GERMANY )
Philipp Weigl, Silently Moving, 2012  ( GERMANY )

— world / roots —
Geoffrey Oryema Exile, 1990  ( UGANDA / FRANCE )
Geoffrey Oryema Beat the Border, 1993  ( UGANDA / FRANCE )
Geoffrey Oryema Night to Night, 1996  ( UGANDA / FRANCE )
Rajendra Teredesai, Divine Dimension, 2012  ( INDIA )
Samuel Yirga, Guzo, 2012  ( ETHIOPIA )

[ 2008 list ]   [ 2009 list ]   [ 2010 list ]   [ 2011 list ]   [ 2012 list ]   [ 2013 list ]   [ 2014 list ]

Tags:

peteyoung
Share
GENRE  NOVELS & NOVELLAS ( INCLUDING RE-READS )
Poul Anderson, Virgin Planet  1959
Aliette de Bodard, 'On a Red Station, Drifting'  2012
J.F. Bone, The Lani People  1962
Leo Brett (R. Lionel Fanthorpe), Mind Force  1961
Fredric Brown, Rogue in Space  1957
Fredric Brown, The Mind Thing  1961
John Brunner, A Planet of Your Own  1966
Algis Budrys, Rogue Moon  1960
Suzanne Collins, The Hunger Games  2008
Philip K. Dick, Time Out of Joint  1959
Philip K. Dick, We Can Build You  1969
Philip K. Dick, Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said  1974
Philip K. Dick, The Simulacra  1964
George Elliot, The Lifted Veil  1921
Bron Fane (R. Lionel Fanthorpe), Juggernaut  1960
Bron Fane (R. Lionel Fanthorpe), Satellite  1960
Bron Fane (R. Lionel Fanthorpe), Nemesis  1964
R. Lionel Fanthorpe, The Waiting World  1958
R. Lionel Fanthorpe, M.B.I.S. Juggernaut  1960
Philip José Farmer, Flesh  1960
J.I. Greco, Rocketship Patrol  2012
Donald E. Keyhoe, The Mystery of the Dragon's Shadow  1936
Chan Koonchung, The Fat Years  2009
Lucian of Samosata, True History  c.150
David I. Masson, The Caltraps of Time  1968
Ward Moore, Bring the Jubilee  1952
John E. Muller (R. Lionel Fanthorpe), Orbit One  1962
John E. Muller (R. Lionel Fanthorpe), Return of Zeus  1962
John E. Muller (R. Lionel Fanthorpe), Beyond the Void  1962
Fletcher Pratt, The Onslaught from Rigel  1932
Adam Roberts, 'Jupiter Magnified'  2012
Robert Silverberg, Dying Inside  1972
Vandana Singh, 'Distances'  2007
Curt Siodmak, Donovan's Brain  1943
Pel Torro (R. Lionel Fanthorpe), Formula 29X  1963
Kilgore Trout (Philip José Farmer), Venus on the Half-Shell  1974

GENRE  ANTHOLOGIES, COLLECTIONS & MAGAZINES
Hassan Blasim, The Iraqi Christ  2013
Paolo Chikiamco, ed., Alternative Alamat  2011
Jason Erik Lundberg, ed., Fish Eats Lion  2012
Jason Erik Lundberg, ed., Lontar #1  2013
Kate Osias, Nikki Alfar, eds., Philippine Speculative Fiction, vol. 6  2011
Kate Osias, Alex Osias, eds., Philippine Speculative Fiction, vol. 7  2012
June Yang, Joyce Chng, eds., Ayam Curtain  2012
International Science Fiction, June 1968

GENRE  SHORT STORIES & NOVELETTES
Joelyn Alexandra, 'Unwanted Utopia 1'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Dean Francis Alfar, 'L'Aquilone du Estrellas (The Kite of Stars)'  (STRANGE HORIZONS, JANUARY 2003)
Dean Francis Alfar, 'An Excerpt from "A Door Opens: the Beginning of the Fall of the Ispancialo-in-Hinirang (Emprensa Press: 2007)" by Salahuddin Alonto, Annotated by Omar Jamad Maududi, MLS, HOL, JMS.'  (PAOLO CHIKIAMCO, ed., ALTERNATIVE ALAMAT, 2011)
Dean Francis Alfar, 'The New Daughter'  (PHILIPPINE GENRE STORIES, OCTOBER 2012)
Dean Francis Alfar, 'Simon's Replica'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
Andrew Ang, 'Vernacular'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Carrick Ang, 'Waiting for the Snow'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Carrick Ang, 'They Come from Faraway Places'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Ivan Ang, 'The Digits'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Ang Si Min, 'World-hopping on Wings'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Jay Steven Anyong, 'Lament of the Counselor'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
M. Bennardo, 'Final Corrections, Pittsburgh Times-Dispatch'  (DAILY SCIENCE FICTION, 3 JANUARY 2013)
M. Bennardo, 'I Heard You Got a Cat, I Heard You Named Him Charles'  (DAILY SCIENCE FICTION, 20 FEBRUARY 2013)
Maria Pia Benosa, 'Eternal Winter'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
Hassan Blasim, 'The Hole'  (THE IRAQI CHRIST, 2013)
Hassan Blasim, 'Dear Beto'  (THE IRAQI CHRIST, 2013)
Hassan Blasim, 'The Iraqi Christ'  (THE IRAQI CHRIST, 2013)
Hassan Blasim, 'Crosswords'  (THE IRAQI CHRIST, 2013)
Hassan Blasim, 'Sarsara's Tree'  (THE IRAQI CHRIST, 2013)
Hassan Blasim, 'The Dung Beetle'  (THE IRAQI CHRIST, 2013)
Hassan Blasim, 'A Thousand and One Knives'  (THE IRAQI CHRIST, 2013)
Paul Blonsky, 'Doctor Was Madman, Family Man'  (DAILY SCIENCE FICTION, 6 MARCH 2013)
Anders Brink, 'Sparrows Over Trees'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Anders Brink, 'The Privilege'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Shelly Bryant, 'Rewrites'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Cai Li Xian, 'Singapore Rock'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Ian Rosales Casocot, 'Alternative Histories: Really Short Stories for the Twitter Generation'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
The Centipede Collective, 'Chapter 28: Energy'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Gregg Chamberlain, 'Jimmy Smith Has a Dinosaur'  (DAILY SCIENCE FICTION, 14 MARCH 2013)
Andrew Cheah, 'The Moon and the Stars'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Paolo Chikiamco, 'Philippine Magic: A Course Catalogue'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., LONTAR: THE JOURNAL OF SOUTHEAST ASIAN SPECULATIVE FICTION #1, 2013)
Joyce Chng, 'Ark'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Zen Cho, 'Love in the Time of Utopia'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., LONTAR: THE JOURNAL OF SOUTHEAST ASIAN SPECULATIVE FICTION #1, 2013)
Geraldine Choo, 'Heart of the Rain Tree'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Dave Chua, 'The Disappearance of Lisa Zhang'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Dave Chua, 'An Urban Bestiary'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Paolo Chikiamco, 'On Wooden Wings'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
Francis Gabriel Concepcion, 'The Break-In on Batay Street'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
John Philip Corpuz, 'Prisoner 2501'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
Hugh Correa, 'Meccano'  (INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE-FICTION, JUNE 1968)
Ray Cummings, 'The Man Who Could Go Away'  (FANTASTIC UNIVERSE, JULY 1955)
Aliette de Bodard, 'The Lost Xuyan Bride'  (INTERZONE 213, DECEMBER 2007)
Aliette de Bodard, 'Butterfly, Falling at Dawn'  (INTERZONE 219, NOVEMBER 2008)
Aliette de Bodard, 'The Jaguar House, in Shadow'  (ASIMOV'S, JULY 2010)
Marc de Faoite, 'Last Time Kopitiam'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Noelle de Jesus, 'Mirage'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Nicholas Derroose, 'Dayuhans'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Arlynn Despi, 'Carpaccio (or, Repentance as a Meat Recipe)'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
Jetse de Vries, 'Transcendence Express'  (HUB MAGAZINE, 2007)
Philip K. Dick, 'A Surface Raid'  (FANTASTIC UNIVERSE, JULY 1955)
Seth Dickinson, 'A Plant (Whose Name Is Destroyed)'  (STRANGE HORIZONS, 19 AUGUST 2013)
Timothy James Dimacali, 'Keeper of My Sky'  (VINCENT MICHAEL SIMBULAN, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION VOLUME 5, 2010)
Lara Elena Donnelly, 'The Witches of Athens'  (STRANGE HORIZONS, 7 OCTOBER 2013)
Andrew Drilon, 'Strange Adventures in Procreation'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
Roger Ebert, 'The Thinking Molecules of Titan'  (NEWYORKER.COM, 4 APRIL 2013)
Raissa Rivera Falgui, 'The Sorceress Queen'  (PAOLO CHIKIAMCO, ed., ALTERNATIVE ALAMAT, 2011)
Raymond G. Falgui, 'The Alipin's Tale'  (PAOLO CHIKIAMCO, ed., ALTERNATIVE ALAMAT, 2011)
Mélanie Fazi, 'Elegy'  (TERRITOIRES DE L'ANGOISSE, 2001)
Mo Francisco, 'Conquering Makiling'  (PAOLO CHIKIAMCO, ed., ALTERNATIVE ALAMAT, 2011)
J.U. Giesy & Junius B. Smith, 'In 2112'  (THE CAVALIER, 10 AUGUST 1912)
Alexandra Grunberg, 'Casting Call'  (DAILY SCIENCE FICTION, 9 JANUARY 2013)
Jaymee Goh, 'Lunar Year's End'  (CROSSED GENRES, JANUARY 2011)
Liana Gurung, 'The Goldfish Bowl'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Asterio Enrico N. Gutierrez, 'The Big Man'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
Amir Hafizi, 'Forms and Functions'  (FUTURA, 2013)
Shane Halbach, 'Downsizing Pluto'  (DAILY SCIENCE FICTION, 7 JANUARY 2013)
Tunku Halim, 'Biggest Baddest Bomoh'  (THE RAPE OF MARTHA TEOH AND OTHER CHILLING STORIES, 1997)
Guy Hasson, 'The Levantine Experiments'  (CHALOMOT BE'ASPAMIA MAGAZINE, 2007)
Joses Ho, 'Her Name Was Jane'  (NATURE, 18 AUGUST 2011)
Lucas Ho, 'KY USB'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
David Hontiveros, 'Balat Buwan, Ngalan (A Myth for the 21st Century)'  (PAOLO CHIKIAMCO, ed., ALTERNATIVE ALAMAT, 2011)
Judith Huang, 'The City'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Jonathan Jie, 'By Wing and Talon'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Fadzilshah Johanabas, 'The Cure'  (FUTURA, 2013)
Isa Kamari, 'Green Man Plus'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Geraldine Kang, 'Two Frames in Between'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Justin Ker, '0110011010100010101001101010011110101001001011001'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Crystal Koo, 'Hollowbody'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
Grace Chia Krakovic, 'Dewy'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Ivan Kwan, 'TaunGaruda'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Christine V. Lao, 'From the Book of Names My Mother Did Not Give Me'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
Ee Leen Lee, 'Future Gardens'  (FUTURA, 2013)
Tanith Lee, 'The Ivory Merchants'  (TAMASTARA, OR THE INDIAN NIGHTS, 1984)
Tanith Lee, 'Oh, Shining Star'  (TAMASTARA, OR THE INDIAN NIGHTS, 1984)
Tanith Lee, 'Tamastara'  (TAMASTARA, OR THE INDIAN NIGHTS, 1984)
Wei Fen Lee, 'Welcome to the Pond'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
David D. Levine, 'The True Story of Merganther's Run'  (BRIDGET McKENNA, MARTI McKENNA, eds., END OF AN AEON, 2011)
Jeffrey Lim, 'Last Supper'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Lim Ming Jie, 'Jumping Ship'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Ken Liu, 'Good Hunting'  (STRANGE HORIZONS, 9–29 OCTOBER 2012)
Rochita Loenen-Ruiz, 'Harinuo's Love Song'  (PAOLO CHIKIAMCO, ed., ALTERNATIVE ALAMAT, 2011)
Frank Belknap Long, 'Rebirth'  (FANTASTIC UNIVERSE, JULY 1955)
Jason Erik Lundberg, 'Hidden in the Leaves'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Win Lyovarin, 'The Other Side of the Black Hole' ( 2011 )  (INTERNOVA, 28 AUGUST 2012)
Kristin Mandigma, 'Excerpt from a Letter by a Socialist Realist Aswang'  (CLARKESWORLD MAGAZINE, OCTOBER 2007)
Naiyer Masud, 'Sheesha Ghat'  (SAUGHAT, 1996)
Melissa Mead, 'Swan Song'  (DAILY SCIENCE FICTION, 24 APRIL 2013)
Anil Menon, 'Into the Night'  (INTERZONE #216, JUNE 2008)
Sam Merwin, Jr., 'The Man from the Flying Saucer'  (FANTASTIC UNIVERSE, JULY 1955)
Joseph Anthony Montecillo, 'Villainoguing'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
Alessandro Mussi, 'Darkness'  (INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE-FICTION, JUNE 1968)
Jamil Nasir, 'The Allah Stairs'  (TALES OF THE UNANTICIPATED, SPRING/SUMMER/FALL 1990)
Ng Yi Sheng, 'Agnes Joachim, Bioterrorist'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Vanessa Ng, 'Tales from the Lonely Tree'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Elka Ray Nguyen, 'The Yellow River'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., LONTAR: THE JOURNAL OF SOUTHEAST ASIAN SPECULATIVE FICTION #1, 2013)
Dayang Noor, 'Rehab'  (FUTURA, 2013)
Victor Fernando R. Ocampo, 'Resurrection'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
Victor Fernando R. Ocampo, 'Big Enough for the Entire Universe'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Victor Fernando R. Ocampo, 'They Called Me the Hyacinth Girl'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Alex Osias, 'The Impossible and the RSC Gregorio del Pilar'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
Kate Osias, 'Departures'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., LONTAR: THE JOURNAL OF SOUTHEAST ASIAN SPECULATIVE FICTION #1, 2013)
Alvin Pang, 'A Better Place'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Maria Elena Paterno, 'A Smell of Mothballs'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
Elyss G. Punsalan, 'Ashland'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
B. Sridhar Rao, 'Victims of Time'  (INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE-FICTION, JUNE 1968)
Eric Frank Russell, 'Proof'  (FANTASTIC UNIVERSE, JULY 1955)
Linah Saleh, 'Artifact #1N-327'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Ekaterina Sedia, 'Zombie Lenin'  (SEAN WALLACE, PAUL TREMBLAY, eds., FANTASY, 2007)
Vincent Michael Simbulan, 'The Grim Malkin'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
Shivani Sivagurunathan, 'Lungs'  (FUTURA, 2013)
Ben Slater, 'Punggol'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Han Song, 'The Wheel of Samsara'  (SCIENCE FICTION WORLD, 2002)
Dal Stivens, 'Moving with the Times'  (FANTASTIC UNIVERSE, JULY 1955)
Yasser Suratman, 'Tiong 2040'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Yasser Suratman, 'Coming Home'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Budjette Tan, 'The Last Full Show'  (PAOLO CHIKIAMCO, ed., ALTERNATIVE ALAMAT, 2011)
Charles Tan, 'The Bookshelves of Ms. Go'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
Cherie Tan, 'The Gilded Cage'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Michelle Tan, 'The Librarian'  (PHILIPPINE GENRE STORIES, DECEMBER 2011)
Michelle Tan, 'Garisan Kuning'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Gwyneth Teo, 'Battery'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Tan Ming Tuan, 'Open'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Celestine Trinidad, 'Beneath the Acacia'  (KENNETH YU, ed., THE DIGEST OF PHILIPPINE GENRE STORIES VOLUME 1, ISSUE 2, 2007)
Tse Hao Guang, 'Salt'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Andrei Tupaz, 'Offerings to Aman Sinaya'  (NIKKI ALFAR, KATE OSIAS, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION Vol. 6, 2011)
Eliza Victoria, 'Ana's Little Pawn Shop on Makiling St.'  (PAOLO CHIKIAMCO, ed., ALTERNATIVE ALAMAT, 2011)
Eliza Victoria, 'The Storyteller's Curse'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
Kaaron Warren, 'Ghost Jail'  (BEN PAYNE, ALISA KRASNOSTEIN, eds., 2012, 2008)
Taral Wayne, 'Mything Persons'  (NEW TOY 1, FEBRUARY 1986)
Liz Williams, 'A Child of the Dead'  (INTERZONE #123, SEPTEMBER 1997)
Cyril Wong, 'Zero Hour'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Angeline Woon, 'The Domed City'  (FUTURA, 2013)
Xie Shi Min, 'Incubation'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Daryl Yam, 'Apocalypse Approaches'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Jerrold Yam, 'Speaking Bird Language'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Jy Yang, 'Where No Cars Go'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Jy Yang, 'Interview'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Jy Yang, 'The War Going On Beneath Us'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Yang Ping, 'Wizard World'  (SCIENCE FICTION WORLD, 1998)
Nir Yaniv, 'Cinderers'  (CHALOMOT BE'ASPAMIA MAGAZINE, 2004)
Stephanie Ye, 'The Story of the Kiss'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Clara Yeo, 'Woodwind'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Eleanor Yeo, 'The Heartland'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Kenneth Yu, 'The Kiddie Pool'  (KATE OSIAS, NIKKI ALFAR, eds., PHILIPPINE SPECULATIVE FICTION, Vol. 6, 2011)
Yuen Kit Man, 'Feng Shui Train'  (JASON ERIK LUNDBERG, ed., FISH EATS LION, 2012)
Yuen Xiang Hao, 'Halcyon Days'  (JUNE YANG, JOYCE CHNG, eds., AYAM CURTAIN, 2012)
Aleksander Ziljak, 'An Evening in the City Coffeehouse, with Lydia on My Mind'  (KRHOTINE SVJETOVA, 1999)
Zoran Živković, 'Compartments'  (PETER CROWTHER, ed., POSTSCRIPTS, 2004)

NON-GENRE  NOVELS & NOVELLAS ( INCLUDING RE-READS )
Robert Bloch, Psycho  1959
Fredric Brown, The Far Cry  1951
Douglas Coupland, Life After God  1994
Harlan Ellison, Web of the City  1958
Damon Galgut, The Quarry  1995
Nadine Gordimer, The Late Bourgeois World  1966
Andreï Makine, The Woman Who Waited  2004
Phaswane Mpe, Welcome to Our Hillbrow  2001
Flann O'Brien, The Poor Mouth  1941
Robert Silverberg, Blood on the Mink  1962
S.P. Somtow, The Stone Buddha's Tears  2012
Linn Ullman, Grace  2002
Donald E. Westlake, 361  1962
Roger Zelazny, The Dead Man's Brother  c.1970

NON-GENRE  SHORT STORIES & NOVELETTES
Hassan Blasim, 'The Song of the Goats'  (THE IRAQI CHRIST, 2013)
Hassan Blasim, 'The Fifth Floor Window'  (THE IRAQI CHRIST, 2013)
Hassan Blasim, 'The Green Zone Rabbit'  (THE IRAQI CHRIST, 2013)
Hassan Blasim, 'A Wolf'  (THE IRAQI CHRIST, 2013)
Hassan Blasim, 'The Killers and the Compass'  (THE IRAQI CHRIST, 2013)
Hassan Blasim, 'Why Don't You Write a Novel, Instead of Talking About All These Characters?'  (THE IRAQI CHRIST, 2013)
Felix Cheong, 'Because I Tell'  (VERENA TAY, ed., A MONSOON FEAST, 2012)
Suchen Christine Lim, 'Big Wall Newspaper'  (MOVING WORLDS: A JOURNAL OF TRANSCULTURAL WRITINGS, Vol. 10, No. 1 2010)
Shashi Tharoor, 'The Death of a Schoolmaster'  (THE FIVE DOLLAR SMILE, 1990)

Tags:

peteyoung
Share
big red button

Reasons to dislike Royalty Free licensing #5,741: Here's a photo I took in a San Francisco diner a few years ago (Lori's Diner on Market St., if you must know). Last year Getty Images got round to licensing it, and put it up for sale as a 'royalty free' image. No problem with me so far, if a sale is for 'end use' and the image is not sold on further. But for the last couple of months this photo has been bought on a monthly basis by Fine Art America, who pay Getty $78 each time, with the creator getting 20% (in this case $15). Fine Art America then put the image up for sale on their website in several formats, the most expensive of which is an acrylic print going for $90 ...and I get precisely 0% on any further sale of my image. I know plenty of stories like this, some of which have the 'royalty free' photographer/artist missing out on substantial sums of money that would feed their families for years. AFAIK there's nothing illegal in what's being done, but can I just say, IT SUCKS.

Tags: , ,

peteyoung
Share


The Amazing Transparent Man, 1960, USA   DIRECTED BY EDGAR G. ULMER
This is more of a crime caper with a science fictional underpinning than a genre movie outright, and is another film loosely based – somehow – on Richard Matheson's The Shrinking Man with a screenplay by Jack Lewis, who was already well known for his Westerns. Paul Krenner, a former US Army Major, plans to create an invisible private army with which he'll conquer the world, but he needs more fissionable material with which to complete the job. He springs from jail a selfish and notorious safe-cracker, Joey Faust, to steal the stuff from under the nose of the Army after he's been made invisible; Faust then tries to double-cross Krenner and things begin to spiral out of control. This is a very humdrum film, made even more so by too many scenes where little of interest is actually going on dramatically and characters are give too much low-key filler time instead of getting to the point. Douglas Kennedy, who played Faust, had already worked on some more memorable SF such as 1953's Invaders from Mars and the cheap 1957 dinosaur caper The Land Unknown, although in this movie he actually gets to act a bit more even if he is invisible half the time; This was also to be the last film for Marguerite Chapman, who played Alita in Flight to Mars. The film's biggest downfall is that all the characters are just uninteresting people, and the unbelievably cheap effects aren't in the slightest bit convincing. There were probably worse genre films around at the time although I'm sure none were given a worse ending.

Tags: ,

peteyoung
Share
First, annual birthday co-habitee salutations to Messrs. commonpeople and purplecthulhu. I am not 100 today, I just feel it. Where's my cake?

Second, I hope more frequent updating will be resuming here as soon as possible. I know I've been crap around here lately... I'm just re-organising my Live Journal a bit, doing some retro-fitting and re-evaluating of what I use LJ for. I've probably been more active on Facebook the last six months because so many of my social circles seem to intersect there, even though I still don't actually like Facebook nearly as much as I like what LJ does. But I do still read my LJ Friends page regularly, even though I may not be commenting nearly as much.

Tags:

peteyoung
Share
Three rules that describe our reactions to technologies (attributed to Douglas Adams)
1: “Anything that is in the world when you're born is normal and ordinary and is just a natural part of the way the world works.”
2: “Anything that's invented between when you're fifteen and thirty-five is new and exciting and revolutionary and you can probably get a career in it.”
3: “Anything invented after you're thirty-five is against the natural order of things.”
[ from The Salmon of Doubt, 2002 ]


Arken's Law (attributed to Arken at www.iidb.com)
“A discussion is over when present society is compared to George Orwell's 'Oceania' in the book Nineteen Eighty-Four.”
[ RationalWiki | Urban Dictionary ]


Asimov's Three Laws of Robotics (attributed to Isaac Asimov)
The First Law states: “A robot may not, through its actions or inactions, allow a human to come to harm.”
The Second Law states: “A robot must obey any order given to it, unless in contradiction of the First Law.”
The Third Law states: “A robot must protect its own existence, unless in contradiction of the First or Second Law.”
[ from 'Runaround', 1942 ]
[ RationalWiki ]


Benford's Law of Controversy (attributed to Gregory Benford, from the novel Timescape)
“Passion is inversely proportional to the amount of real information available.”
[ Wikipedia ]


The Blinovich Limitation Effect (attributed to Terrance Dicks and Barry Letts)
Usually understood as having two aspects: firstly, that “a time traveller cannot 'redo' an act that he has previously committed”, and secondly, that “a dangerous energy discharge will result if two temporal versions of the same person come into contact.”
Two of Aaron Blinovich's Laws are also invoked in the 2000 time travel film Happy Accidents:
Blinovitch's Second Law of Temporal Inertia states: “It is impossible to time travel in your own lifetime. One can only time travel to the distant past, and only small changes in history are possible, which will "dampen out" by the time they reach the relative present.”
Blinovitch's Fifth Law of Causal Determination resolves (in an unspecified manner) all paradoxes involved with time travel.
[ Tardis Wikia | Wikipedia ]


Burnside's Advice (attributed to Ken Burnside)
“Friends don't let friends use reactionless drives in their universes.”
[ ProjectRho.com ]


Celine's Laws (attributed to Robert Anton Wilson in the Illuminatus! trilogy)
The First Law states: “National Security is the chief cause of national insecurity.”
The Second Law states: “Accurate communication is possible only in a non-punishing situation.”
The Third Law states: “An honest politician is a national calamity.”
[ Wikipedia ]


The Chronology Protection Conjecture (attributed to Stephen Hawking)
“It seems that there is a Chronology Protection Agency which prevents the appearance of closed timelike curves and so makes the universe safe for historians.”
[ Arcana Wiki | Wikipedia ]


Clarke's Law of Revolutionary New Ideas (attributed to Sir Arthur C. Clarke)
“Like all revolutionary new ideas, the subject has had to pass through three stages, which may be summed up by these reactions: (1) 'It’s crazy – don't waste my time.' (2) 'It’s possible, but it’s not worth doing.' (3) 'I always said it was a good idea.’”
— 'Next – The Planets!', Report on Planet Three, 1972.


Clarke's Three Laws (attributed to Sir Arthur C. Clarke)
The First Law states: “When a distinguished, but elderly, scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.”
— 'Hazards of Prophecy: The Failure of Imagination', Profiles of the Future, 1962; restated in 'Technology and the Future', Report on Planet Three, 1972.
Corollaries to the First Law:
  • Isaac Asimov: “When, however, the lay public rallies round an idea that is denounced by distinguished but elderly scientists and supports that idea with great fervor and emotion -- the distinguished but elderly scientists are then, after all, probably right.” (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, February 1977)

    The Second Law states: “The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into the impossible.”
    — 'Technology and the Future', Report on Planet Three, 1972.

    The Third Law states: “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.”
    — 'Technology and the Future', Report on Planet Three, 1972.

    Corollaries to the Third Law:
  • Arlan Andrews, Sr.: “Any sufficiently advanced magic is indistinguishable from technology.” ('Indian Summa', Analog, January 1989)
  • Grey's Law: “Any sufficiently advanced incompetence is indistinguishable from malice.” (see also Hanlon's Razor)
  • Shermer's Last Law: “Any sufficiently advanced ETI is indistinguishable from God.”
  • Gehm's Corollary: “Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced.” (Dr. Barry Gehm, Analog, 1991(?); once known as 'Benford's Corollary' and attributed to Gregory Benford from his use of it in Foundation's Fear, 1997, later attributed to Gehm as the originator)
  • I-CON SF: “Any sufficiently advanced iPhone is indistinguishable from magic.”
  • Rich Kulaweic: “Any sufficiently advanced bug is indistinguishable from a feature.”
  • Karl Schroeder: “Any sufficiently advanced civilization is indistinguishable from nature.”
  • Unknown: “Any sufficiently advanced science fiction is indistinguishable from fantasy.” (attributed to Science Fiction fandom)
  • Unknown: “Any sufficiently well-understood magic is indistinguishable from technology.” (attributed to Science Fiction fandom)
  • Unknown: “If you cannot distinguish my technology from magic, you are not sufficiently advanced.”
  • [Also add Charles Sheffield's variant buried somewhere in the 'Convergence' series.]
    [ RationalWiki | RationalWiki: Grey's Law | Wikipedia: Shermer's Last Law ]


    Finagle's Law of Dynamic Negatives (also known as Finagle's Corollary to Murphy's Law) (attributed to John W. Campbell)
    “Anything that can go wrong, will – at the worst possible moment.”

    Corollaries to Finagle's Law:
  • O'Toole's Corollary of Finagle's Law: “The perversity of the Universe tends towards a maximum”, popularised by Larry Niven.
  • Ads for bookplates run by Galaxy Magazine in the late 1960s stated "The umpteenth corollary of Finagle's Law of Dynamic Negatives states "No books are ever lost by loaning except ones you particularly want to keep." "
    [ Wikipedia ]


    Godwin's Law of Time Travel (attributed to colonel_green at scans-daily)
    “The first rule of time travel is that any and all modifications made to the timeline result in Hitler winning World War II. Run over a hippy in 1968? Hitler wins.”
    [ Arcana Wiki | TV Tropes ]


    Haldane's Law (attributed to J.B.S. Haldane)
    “I have no doubt that in reality the future will be vastly more surprising than anything I can imagine. Now, my own suspicion is that the universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but queerer than we can suppose.”
    — J.B.S. Haldane, Possible Worlds, 1927.


    Hanlon's Razor (attributed to Robert Heinlein)
    “Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity.”
    [ RationalWiki ]
    See also: Grey's Law under Clarke's Three Laws.


    Hitler's Time Travel Exemption Act (attribution unknown)
    “If you time-travel into the past and then try to kill Hitler, it won't work as intended. It may even backfire.”
    [ Arcana Wiki | TV Tropes ]
    See also Godwin's Law of Time Travel.


    Jon's First Law (attributed to Jon Souza)
    “Any interesting space drive is a weapon of mass destruction. It only matters how long you want to wait for maximum damage.” It goes on to say: "Interesting is equal to ‘whatever keeps the readers from getting bored’”.
    [ ProjectRho.com | Jon Souza ]
    See also Larry Niven's Kzinti Lesson.


    Ken Hite's Rule (attributed to Ken Hite)
    “Alternative Universes tend to have more Zeppelins.”


    The Kzinti Lesson (attributed to Larry Niven)
    “A reaction drive's efficiency as a weapon is in direct proportion to its efficiency as a drive.”
    [ larryniven.net ]
    See also Jon's First Law and Niven's Laws.


    Moff's Law (attributed to Josh Wimmer at io9.com)
    "Of all the varieties of irritating comment out there, the absolute most annoying has to be “Why can’t you just watch the movie for what it is??? Why can’t you just enjoy it? Why do you have to analyze it???” If you have posted such a comment, or if you are about to post such a comment, here or anywhere else, let me just advise you: Shut up. Shut the fuck up. Shut your goddamn fucking mouth. SHUT. UP."
    Codified as:
    1) As a discussion of a creative work grows longer, the probability of some ass whining about "overanalyzing" approaches 1.
    2) In any discussion of creative work, anyone who says "OMG, why can't you just enjoy it??" automatically loses.
    [ Racialicious ]


    Muphry's Law (attributed to John Bangsund)
    (a) if you write anything criticizing editing or proofreading, there will be a fault of some kind in what you have written;
    (b) if an author thanks you in a book for your editing or proofreading, there will be mistakes in the book;
    (c) the stronger the sentiment expressed in (a) and (b), the greater the fault;
    (d) any book devoted to editing or style will be internally inconsistent.
    [ Wikipedia | John Bangsund ]


    Niven's Law (attributed to Larry Niven)
    “If the universe of discourse permits the possibility of time travel and of changing the past, then no time machine will be invented in that universe.”
    [ Wikipedia ]


    Niven's Laws (attributed to Larry Niven, from the collection Known Space)
    1. a. Never throw shit at an armed man.
        b. Never stand next to someone who is throwing shit at an armed man.
    2. Never fire a laser at a mirror.
    3. Mother Nature doesn't care if you're having fun.
    4. F × S = k. The product of Freedom and Security is a constant. To gain more freedom of thought and/or action, you must give up some security, and vice versa.
    5. Psi and/or magical powers, if real, are nearly useless.
    6. It is easier to destroy than create.
    7. Any damn fool can predict the past.
    8. History never repeats itself.
    9. Ethics change with technology.
    10. Anarchy is the least stable of social structures. It falls apart at a touch.
    11. There is a time and place for tact. And there are times when tact is entirely misplaced.
    12. The ways of being human are bounded but infinite.
    13. The world's dullest subjects, in order:
            a. Somebody else's diet.
            b. How to make money for a worthy cause.
            c. Special Interest Liberation.
    14. The only universal message in science fiction: There exist minds that think as well as you do, but differently.
            Niven's corollary: The gene-tampered turkey you're talking to isn't necessarily one of them.
    15. Fuzzy Pink Niven's Law: Never waste calories.
    16. There is no cause so right that one cannot find a fool following it.
            In variant form in Fallen Angels as “Niven's Law: No cause is so noble that it won't attract fuggheads.”
    17. No technique works if it isn't used.
    18. Not responsible for advice not taken.
    19. Old age is not for sissies.
    20. “Do some basic physics before writing Ringworld.
    [ Wikipedia ]
    See also Larry Niven's Kzinti Lesson.


    The Novikov Self Consistency Principle (attributed to Igor Novikov)
    Concerning time paradoxes, “If an event exists that would give rise to a paradox, or to any "change" to the past whatsoever, then the probability of that event is zero.”
    [ Arcana Wiki | Wikipedia ]


    Pellegrino, Powell and Asimov's Three Laws of Alien Behaviour (attributed to Charles Pellegrino, James Powell and Isaac Asimov)
    The First Law states: “Their survival will be more important than our survival. If an alien species has to choose between them and us, they won't choose us. It is difficult to imagine a contrary case; species don't survive by being self-sacrificing.
    The Second Law states: “Wimps don't become top dogs. No species makes it to the top by being passive. The species in charge of any given planet will be highly intelligent, alert, aggressive, and ruthless when necessary.
    The Third Law states: “They will assume that the first two laws apply to us.”
    — from the front endpapers of Charles Pellegrino's Flying to Valhalla, 1993.


    Robinson's First Law of Space Combat
    “An object impacting at 3 km/sec delivers kinetic energy equal to its mass in TNT.”
    [ ProjectRho.com | Rick Robinson ]


    Rule 34
    “If it exists, there is porn related to it.”
    Adapted by Charles Stross as Rule 34.1: “Anything on the internet can be construed as filth, by a mind that's sufficiently warped.”
    [ Rule 34 | Telegraph.co.uk | Urban Dictionary ]


    Scalzi's Law (attributed to John Scalzi)
    “The failure mode of clever is asshole.”
    [ Whatever ]


    Sturgeon's Law (attributed to Theodore Sturgeon)
    “Nothing is always absolutely so.”
    [ Wikipedia ]


    Sturgeon's Revelation, now more commonly known as Sturgeon's Law (attributed to Theodore Sturgeon)
    “Ninety percent of everything is crud.” Now more likely to be seen as “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”
    — World Science Fiction Covention, Philadelphia, 1953.
    [ Wikipedia ]
    As related in the anecdote: “When people talk about the mystery novel,” Ted said, as I remember, “they mention The Maltese Falcon and The Big Sleep. When they talk about the western, they say there's The Way West and Shane. But when they talk about science fiction, they call it 'that Buck Rogers stuff', and they say 'ninety percent of science fiction is crud.' Well, they're right. Ninety percent of science fiction is crud. But then ninety percent of everything is crud, and it's the ten percent that isn't crud that is important. And the ten percent of science fiction that isn't crud is as good as or better than anything being written anywhere.”
    — James Gunn, The New York Review of Science Fiction #85, September 1995.

    Rucker's Corollary to Sturgeon's Law:
  • Lee Ann Rucker: “The Golden Age looks so good because we've forgotten the 90% that's crap.” (rec.arts.sf.written, Jan 2001)


    The Ten Commandments for Reading the Magazines (attributed to Stanislaw Lem, translated by Franz Rottensteiner)
    You shall stop reading a work of SF:
    1. in which gods, angels, demons, devils and other mythical beings appear, the work nevertheless being called "SF".
    2. in which members of "other civilisations" appear, not as seen through the eyes of human observers, but described "quite directly" – from the godlike position of a master strategist.
    3. in which the names of the characters (if only some of them) are constructed by a distortion of the paradigm of proper names in the alien language concerned (for instance, "Alexi Andrei" is supposed to serve as the name of a Pole, or "Kohlbenschlagg" as the name of a German; such are the signs with which an author betrays his ignorance which masquerades as arrogance) – any serious author takes the names of his heroes from models of the country where the alien tongue is spoken, and he does so by selecting genuine sources: there are no exceptions to this rule.
    4. which is armed with a foreword by the author in which he declares that he writes in such-and-such a way, whereas Swift, Voltaire or Flaubert, Joyce, etc., wrote in such-and-such a way: in general, the length of the foreword is in inverse proportion to the quality of the text.
    5. in which it is impossible to determine, after having read the first pages, the time, place the objects of the plot.
    6. in which the names of all the characters are monosyllables.
    7. in which there is an "escalation of the fantastic" – i.e. the hero is a telepath, but he is not one of the usual telepaths: he is a telepath who can set fire to objects just by willing it: and it's not only that he can light his cigarettes in such a way – he can also turn the sun into a supernova: but not only can he turn the sun into a supernova, normal telepaths cannot read his thoughts: and not only is it impossible to read his thoughts, but etc. …
    8. in which the plot moves, in a very short space, from one point of the Earth, or the solar system, or the galaxy, to other points.
    9. in which the main characteristics of extraterrestrial humanoids are a peculiar number of fingers (4 or 6, say), or a peculiar chemical composition of their bodies.
    10. in which the characters admire qualities among themselves (for instance, incisiveness of intellect or humour which, when presented to the reader, do not so impress him.


    The Three Laws of Infernal Dynamics (attributed to David Gerrold's alter-ego Solomon Short)
    The First Law states: An object in motion will always be headed in the wrong direction.
    The Second Law states: An object at rest will always be in the wrong place.
    The Third Law states: The energy required to change either of these states will always be more than you wish to expend, but never so much as to make the task prospectively impossible.
    [ from Yesterday's Children / Starhunt, 1980 edition ]

    Tags:

  • peteyoung
    Share
    R.I.P. Harry Harrison. I met Harry three times (although I was hardly on first name terms with him): once at Novacon, where I bought him a pint; once at Glasgow Airport where I asked the check-in staff to 'look after him' on his flight to Gatwick; and once at Noreascon in Boston, where we walked together from the Marriott Hotel over that long bridge to the Convention Center. He was always one of the funniest writers, except when he wrote darker things like Make Room! Make Room!, a dystopian novel of an overpopulated New York, and one that deserves to be on the SF Masterworks list. I'll be taking a walk up Lexington Avenue this afternoon, and I'll probably be thinking of Harry.

    Tags: ,

    peteyoung
    Share

    Our one-and-a-half year old Pomeranian/Samoyed crossbreed was attacked and killed by a couple of street dogs this morning, the same dogs Buddy liked to hang out with when he escaped the garden. I guess they just turned on him. He's now buried in the back garden. Rest in peace Buddy, you always surprised us with how you loved to live on the edge and yet still managed to be a great companion for Miles. You lived too fast and died way too young, and now we'll miss you way too much.

    Tags: ,

    peteyoung
    Share
    peteyoung
    Share
    Updating my list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites that I've visited. Last time I looked in 2010 the list had increased to 911 and I was able to add a few such as the Sydney Opera House. It's since been increased to 944, and I'm now able to add Fort Jesus in Mombasa and the Birthplace of Jesus in the Church of the Nativity and the Pilgrimage Route, Bethlehem, controversial only because it's in Palestine whose UN membership was opposed by the US and Israel.

    So: 43 so far, worldwide. [Up-update: 44] As Iguaçu National Park is listed under both Argentina and Brazil I'm counting it as one location, even though I've been to both sides of the falls on either side of the border. And I really should do the Statue of Liberty some time, now that it's fully open to the public again.

    Argentina
  • Iguazu National Park

    Australia
  • Sydney Opera House

    Austria
  • Historic Centre of Vienna

    Bahrain
  • Ancient Harbour and Capital of Dilmun

    Bermuda
  • Historic Town of St George and Related Fortifications

    Brazil
  • Iguaçu National Park

    China
  • Historic Centre of Macau
  • The Great Wall

    Egypt
  • Memphis and its Necropolis – the Pyramid Fields from Giza to Dahshur

    France
  • Arles, Roman and Romanesque Monuments
  • Roman Theatre and its Surroundings and the "Triumphal Arch" of Orange
  • Paris, Banks of the Seine
  • Historic Centre of Avignon: Papal Palace, Episcopal Ensemble and Avignon Bridge
  • The Loire Valley between Sully-sur-Loire and Chalonnes
  • Le Havre, the City Rebuilt by Auguste Perret

    Greece
  • Acropolis, Athens

    India
  • Agra Fort
  • Taj Mahal
  • Red Fort Complex, Delhi

    Israel
  • Masada
  • Old City of Jerusalem and its Walls

    Italy
  • Historic Centre of Rome
  • Vatican City
  • Venice and its Lagoon

    Japan
  • Hiroshima Peace Memorial (Genbaku Dome)

    Kenya
  • Fort Jesus, Mombasa

    Mexico
  • Historic Centre of Mexico City and Xochimilco
  • Pre-Hispanic City of Teotihuacan

    Morocco
  • Medina of Marrakesh

    Palestine
  • Birthplace of Jesus: Church of the Nativity and the Pilgrimage Route, Bethlehem

    Peru
  • Historic Centre of Lima
  • Historic Centre of the City of Arequipa

    Thailand
  • Historic City of Ayutthaya

    United Kingdom
  • Giant's Causeway and Causeway Coast
  • Stonehenge, Avebury and Associated Sites
  • City of Bath
  • Tower of London
  • EDIT: Maritime Greenwich
  • Old and New Towns of Edinburgh
  • Dorset and East Devon Coast
  • Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
  • Westminster Palace, Westminster Abbey and Saint Margaret's Church
  • Cornwall and West Devon Mining Landscape

    United States of America
  • Grand Canyon National Park
  • Redwood National and State Parks

    Tags:

  • peteyoung
    Share
    A Very Happy Fannish Birthday to hal_obrien.
    peteyoung
    Share
    Very Happy Fannish Birthdays to coalescent and ladymoonray.
    peteyoung
    Share


    10) Susanna Tamaro, Answer Me, 2001
    A worthwhile collection that explores that heavily populated border between Catholicism and atheism. There is something precarious about all the characters in these three novelettes, raised on religion yet finding themselves in long-term situations where religious faith does not help: in 'Hell Does Not Exist', easily the best story, an abused wife attempts to protect her young son from his violent father, and yet as a teenager the son becomes the cause of personal devastation. In 'Answer Me' an orphaned girl with a troubled past searches for signs that she is loved while cultivating an inner hardness that allows her to carry on, and in 'The Burning Forest' a widower gives an account of the unravelling of his marriage while seeking the forgiveness of his estranged daughter. I was rather taken with these stories, or rather the Stygian voice with which Tamaro relates them. They were certainly not comfortable reads – I expect for people with faith they would be even less so – and their quiet power is both startling and a little disturbing. This is fiction that doesn't shout its atheism, just quietly points out how Christianity can indeed be either an unhelpful distraction when dealing with some life's major problems, or even the cause of them. A dark book, and necessarily so.

    Tags: , ,

    peteyoung
    Share


    9) Roberto Bolaño, Antwerp, 2002
    Antwerp is a difficult novel to summarise, given that it’s a formative work in Bolaño’s oeuvre and one that possibly bears more relation to his poetry than his later fiction. These are fifty-six vignettes that function in part like snatches of half-remembered films, concerning a possible murder on a campsite in Spain. But just who has been murdered, and is the killer perhaps a reflection of the author himself? This is not the familiar Bolaño of the long, discursive sentences that became a style he settled into and made his own; instead Antwerp possesses a different form of intensity, perhaps showing the uncertainty of a writer in the act of setting things down in order to first find his own voice to make it stand out, or at least aside, from the influences of those he was reading at the time (among them, Norman Spinrad and James Tiptree, Jr.). Having said that, Bolaño once proclaimed this is the only novel he was not embarrassed about, which hints more at the integrity of the prosaic form he chose to use than the lack of clarity given to a reader: in 1980 it was written without any expectation of publication, but today it gives us a compact insight into the set of themes that Bolaño continued to use throughout his life. Disconnected sentences shoot past you like bullets, and the reader has to almost rearrange, Burroughs-like, what he or she is told and make of it what he or she can. Antwerp is still a self-conscious book for all its merits, but in this brief work it’s easy to discern the writer Bolaño would become in the years ahead: still manically driven at the fringes of literature, but also a far more relaxed and eloquent performer in the act of getting his message across.

    Tags: , ,

    peteyoung
    Share


    8) Tony Parsons, Departures, 2011
    In August 2011 Tony Parsons became writer-in-residence at Heathrow’s Terminal 5, and these seven interlinked short stories are the result of that fruitful week. Having been connected with Heathrow for most of my professional life I thought this collection might be a bit of an unrewarding ‘busman’s holiday’, but it’s the details of the working lives of other Heathrow mavens that really caught my eye, and for readers unconnected with Heathrow other than when just passing through these stories will probably be even more eye-opening: the mysterious green plane near the perimeter, the bird-scarers, the relentless attempts of small-time criminals to evade border control, the stressful lives of travelling animals, the remote coolness of the air traffic controllers, the pull of the sky and the amazement that can come from thinking too much about modern aviation. I had a problem with the feasability of the first story in this small collection but in truth that’s a minor cavil; Parsons’s characterisation is good (particularly the seen-it-all humanity of his Border Agency immigration officer Jaswinder Smith) and this successful collection is going on my shelf for keeps. Nice one, Tony.

    Tags: , , ,

    peteyoung
    Share


    Galaxy of Terror, 1981, USA   DIRECTED BY BRUCE D. CLARK
    Slightly derivative of both Alien and Forbidden Planet, Galaxy of Terror deservedly bombed at the box office but has since gained a big cult following mostly because of that ubiquitous B-movie producer's credit, "Roger Corman". The story is familiar enough: the crew of a spaceship investigate a mysterious pyramid on a distant planet and come face-to-face with their own monsters from the Id. How they are picked off is predictable enough, with the possible exception of one crew member whose biggest fear is rape, and who gets tangled up rather unpleasantly with a giant worm. This was a scene that, in a rather sick twist, Corman had privately promised his financial backers; the director and actress refused to shoot it so Corman shot it himself with a body double, and the censors then insisted on making cuts (the entire scene is, apparently, lost). It's still the scene you remember from an otherwise unremarkable movie; everything looks like Aliens (but then that's possibly because James Cameron was the production designer), the monster effects look good despite not being the least bit scary, and the compulsory gore and dismemberment scenes look just a bit too plastic. Plus, it's mostly the annoying, garish and entirely synthesised soundtrack that gives away this movie as being a product of the 1980s. I wish I could say "they don't make 'em like this any more", but unfortunately they do.

    Tags: , , ,

    peteyoung
    Share
    Ray Bradbury famously couldn't stand the internet, but now an internet error code "451" is being proposed when access to a page is being denied because of censorship. What a great tribute to the man.

    Tags: , ,

    peteyoung
    Share


    7) Kurt Vonnegut, Look at the Birdie, 2009
    Fourteen previously unpublished short stories, all enjoyable at the very least, although it would have been useful to know from what stages of Vonnegut's career each of them were written – were they all recent, or do some perhaps date back decades? Then there's the genre question: there's roughly a 50/50 genre/mainstream split, with the more imaginative and fantastical stories not necessarily being the best, although the opening story 'Confido' sets a superior quality mark that those following don't always match. The collection is prefaced with Vonnegut's 1951 letter to Miller Harris, in which he states his creative position as a writer since quitting his job at General Electric in 1951; it's an odd way to open a collection such as this as the stories, with a few exceptions, rarely stand out as boldly imaginative. And Vonnegut's satirical purpose is not always present either, with stories such as 'The Honor of a Newsboy', 'Ed Luby's Key Club' and the charmingly sweet 'A Song for Selma' being as sentimental about 'the ordinary little guy' as Vonnegut probably ever got. For a sharper tone of storytelling the best here is probably 'Little Drops of Water' about a spurned lover's attempts to get back her man, and the most satirical is the clever 'The Petrified Ants', which takes a jaundiced view of the Soviet approach to making an amazing scientific discovery. It provides the best laugh-out-loud moment and this collection, admirable as it is, could probably have done with a few more of those.

    Tags: , , ,

    peteyoung
    Share
    grace   walk with me

    After a couple of lean months with no photo sales, April saw Getty Images selling these two photos, the first of the glass facade of a New York skyscraper to the Spanish branch of Interbrand (probably the world's biggest marketing company), and the second of two men walking across a field in Harare, Zimbabwe (a zoom shot from my hotel room window) to On Track Visual Communication, another marketing company somewhere in Illinois. Both 'Royalty Free' shots and no indication what either will be used for, but because of these sales May was a good month for a little extra cash, all going towards Miles's school fees.

    Tags: , ,

    peteyoung
    Share
    the very hungry caterpillar

    More Tumblr: looking at my Flickr stats just now I see that yesterday this photo (of Penny the bookstore cat in the now-defunct Acres of Books in Long Beach, LA) got a click-through from this 4 month-old Tumblr post by addictedreader27, which I checked out just to see which photo had in fact been blogged. Nice. But even nicer was to discover the 663 notes attached to this photo, all showing rebloggings and likes. Most of the time I reckon my older photos on Flickr are languishing completely unseen unless they turn up in people's search engine results, so it was a surprise to discover just how active this photo has been beyond Flickr without me even knowing about it.

    Tags: , , , ,

    peteyoung
    Share
    The Million Writers Award Notable Stories of 2011 are now up.

    Jason Sanford invited me to be one of the preliminary judges earlier this year, and I spent the entire month of April cramming an average of twenty stories a day across all genres. It was a lot of fun, and I submitted ten nominations from the hundreds that I read – I've not been asked to keep it private, but I will not be saying which nominations were mine. However, I will admit there are a few special ones that I would really really like to see on the shortlist: the top ten stories of the year will be released in June, with the public vote for the top story beginning then.

    Meanwhile, for some truly great reading, go read ’em!

    Tags:

    peteyoung
    Share


    6) Siriworn Kaewkan, The Murder Case of Tok Imam Storpa Karde, 2006
    There are very few novels that explore the separatist terrorism affecting the three small Thai provinces that border Malaysia, and this one, shortlisted for the 2006 SEA Write Award, quickly became required reading that year with an English translation following four years later. So who killed the much-loved imam in the small village of Tanyong Baru, right outside his own mosque? Terrorists or State officials? Soldiers or police? Is there a suspicious connection with a neighbouring Buddhist village? And why are the villagers closing their doors to an actual investigation? The reader's guess is as good as anyone elses, which indicates the clever structure of this tale of deflections and half-truths that inevitably views the subject from an outsider's perpective yet at the same time lets the story's participants speak (seemingly, often less than truthfully) for themselves. Kaewkan simply provides the necessary pieces to the jigsaw then lets the readers assemble it in a way that indicates there's an inevitable collective madness going on here. There are a number of possible courses of events discernable if this short novel is read closely, which is easily done in one sitting – just don't expect a straightforward whodunnit. My brother-in-law recently finished a tour of duty as a policeman in this volatile region, so I'd love to know his opinion of this book.

    Tags: , ,

    peteyoung
    Share

    Outer Space from Sander van den Berg on Vimeo.

    Stunning time-lapse footage of Saturn and Jupiter, plus rings and moons. Via joe_haldeman.

    Tags: ,

    peteyoung
    Share
    Happy Fannish Birthdays to jamesb and del_c.
    guilty as charged
    Pete Young
    User: peteyoung
    Name: Pete Young
    rows of boxes with numbers
    Back January 2014
    1234
    567891011
    12131415161718
    19202122232425
    262728293031
    lists of clicky things
    stuff i'm into